Rubrics

This page contains the following rubrics:

Identifying a Problem Rubric (Chapter 2)

TASK: Identify a Problem
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Relation of Problem to Audience Problem is relevant to literary critics and scholars. Problem is somewhat relevant to literary critics and scholars. Problem is not relevant to literary critics and scholars.
Innovative Thinking Presents an original problem or one that has not been explored in detail, or approaches a known problem in an original way. Presents a known problem in a somewhat original way. Does not present an original problem or a known problem in an original way.
Explanation/Definition of issue Problem is stated clearly and described comprehensively. Problem could be stated with more clarity and more comprehensively. Problem is not stated clearly nor described comprehensively.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA is used correctly while identifying a problem. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly while identifying a problem; however, there are some mistakes. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures used while identifying a problem. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Establishing Relevance Rubric (Chapter 2)

TASK: Establish Relevance
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Answers “So What?” Question Argues convincingly why the topic and claim should matter to the audience. Argues somewhat convincingly why the topic and claim should matter to the audience. Relevance was not established. It does not explain why the topic or claim should matter to the audience.
Specificity Proposes specific answers to the question of relevance. Proposes generic and/or generalized answers to the question of relevance. Proposes overly simplistic answers (or no answers) to the question of relevance.
Consideration of Audience Target audience was carefully considered. Target audience was only somewhat considered. The target audience was not considered.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly while establishing relevance. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly while establishing relevance; however, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures used while establishing relevance. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Evaluating Purpose Rubric (Chapter 2)

TASK: Evaluate Purpose
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Docere, Movere, Delectare (to teach, to move, to delight) Successfully teaches on an intellectual level, touches audience feelings, and keeps their interest. Somewhat teaches on an intellectual level, slightly touches audience feelings, and/or barely keeps their interest. Does not teach on an intellectual level and/or does not touch audience feelings and/or does not keep their interest.
Epideictic (or Ceremonial), Judicial (or Forensic), Deliberative (or Political) Clearly aims for at least one clear purpose: Epideictic (or Ceremonial), Judicial (or Forensic), Deliberative (or Political) Vaguely aims for one of these specific purposes: Epideictic (or Ceremonial), Judicial (or Forensic), Deliberative (or Political) Does not aim for one of these specific purposes: Epideictic (or Ceremonial), Judicial (or Forensic), Deliberative (or Political)
Consideration of Audience The target audience was carefully considered. The target audience was only briefly considered. The target audience was not considered.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly; however, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures. Lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Searching as Strategic Exploration Rubric (Chapter 3)

TASK: Search Strategically
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Inquiry Determined the scope of the project and information needs. Somewhat determined the scope of the project and information needs. Did not determine the scope of the project and information needs.
Discovery Successfully divided a broad search into strategic keywords that yielded high-quality scholarly articles. Divided a broad search into strategic keywords that yielded adequate scholarly articles. Did not divide a broad search into strategic keywords and/or those keywords yielded low-quality scholarly articles.
Serendipity Successfully expanded the scope of the research to include multiple perspectives and was open to unexpected discoveries. Somewhat expanded the scope of the research to include multiple perspectives, but did not discover much new information. Did not expand the scope of the research to include multiple perspectives and/or was not open to unexpected discoveries.

 

Using Evidence for a Research Project Rubric (Chapter 4)

TASK: Use Evidence for a Research Project
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Facts and Reasoning Found significant facts and linked them convincingly to reach a significant and convincing conclusion. Found somewhat significant facts and linked them together to reach a conclusion. Found no additional facts and/or did not link them together sufficiently to reach a convincing conclusion.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. MLA or APA format was used correctly; however, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures used while using evidence in a research project. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Interpreting Literary Works Rubric (Chapter 5)

TASK: Interpret Literary Works
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Use of Schemata Successfully used one or more patterns of meaning (genre, social-cultural, creative, and/or psychological) to interpret and/or critique a literary work. Somewhat successfully used one or more patterns of meaning (genre, social-cultural, creative, and/or psychological) to interpret and/or critique a literary work. Did not use any patterns of meaning (genre, social-cultural, creative, and/or psychological) to interpret and/or critique a literary work.
Moves from Specific to General Interpretation successfully moves from the specific to the general, from the details of the literary work into more conceptual terms. Interpretation sometimes moves from the specific to the general, or the connections are not entirely clear. Interpretation does not move from the specific to the general; often, it stays entirely conceptual or focuses on the details of the literary work without relating them to conceptual terms.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly while interpreting literary works. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly while interpreting literary works; however, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures used while interpreting literary works. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Creating an Annotated Bibliography Rubric (Chapter 6)

TASK: Create an Annotated Bibliography
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Quality/Reliability of Sources Gathers a sufficient number of appropriate sources, which are highly relevant and credible. Gathers a few appropriate sources, which are somewhat relevant and credible. Does not gather enough sources; sources are not appropriate or relevant, or lack credibility.
Currency of Sources Includes sufficiently current content. Lacks some sufficiently current content. Current content is entirely lacking.
Summarization Summarizes the relevant ideas of chosen sources, states the purpose of the resource, and discusses the resource’s contribution to the topic. Vaguely summarizes the relevant ideas of chosen sources. Most entries state the purpose of the resource and the resource’s contribution to the topic. Does not adequately summarize the main ideas of chosen sources. Does not state the purpose of the resource nor the resource’s contribution to the topic.
Annotation The annotation shows careful reading and a clear understanding of the source’s content, quality, and relevance. It clearly explains why the sources were chosen. Offers insight into sources and makes explicit connections to the argument as well as to other chosen sources. The annotation shows some understanding of the source’s content, quality, and relevance. It briefly explains why the sources were chosen. Offers some insight into sources but makes few connections to the argument or to other chosen sources. The annotation shows little to no understanding of the source’s content, quality, and relevance. It does not explain why the sources were chosen. It offers little to no insight into the sources and does not make connections to the argument or to other chosen sources.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA is used correctly throughout the annotated bibliography. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly throughout the annotated bibliography, but with mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. The annotated bibliography contains multiple incorrect sentence structures and lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Creating a Literature Review Rubric (Chapter 6)

TASK: Create a Literature Review
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Introduction of Topic & Research Question Effectively introduces the topic and direction of the literature review. The research question is clearly identified and connected to the content of the review. Introduces the topic of the literature review. The research question is identified and connected to some of the content in the review. Does not introduce the topic of the literature review. The research question is either not identified or not connected to the content of the review.
Coverage of Content/Organization Covers appropriate content related to the topic and research question in depth. Sources are cited correctly. The organization of material is clear, effective, and appropriate. Covers some of the content related to the topic and research question. Sources are cited with minor mistakes. The organization of material is not as clear, effective, and/or appropriate as it could be. Does not cover appropriate content related to the topic and research question. Sources are cited incorrectly. The organization of material is not clear, effective, and/or appropriate.
Meaningful Discourse Demonstrates a clear understanding of the available research about their topic. It situates ideas in existing discourse. Demonstrates a partial understanding of the available research. It partially situates ideas in existing discourse. Does not demonstrate an understanding of the available research. Ideas are not situated in existing discourse.
Essay Form The literature review is in essay form. The literature review is mainly or partly in essay form. The literature review reads like a list of sources summarized.
Consideration of Audience The target audience was carefully considered. The target audience was only somewhat considered. The target audience was not considered.
Connections to Discipline/Synthesis of Ideas Creates “wholes” out of multiple parts, synthesizes, and/or draws conclusions by combining examples, facts, and/or theories. Struggles to make “wholes” out of multiple parts, synthesize, and/or draw conclusions by combining examples, facts, and/or theories. Does not create “wholes” out of multiple parts. Does not synthesize or draw conclusions. Merely summarizes material from different sources.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA is used correctly throughout. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly throughout, but with mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. Lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Finding Trustworthy Sources Rubric (Chapter 9)

TASK: Find Trustworthy Sources
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Authority The author(s) of identified sources are credible and their findings appear in a peer-reviewed academic journal or a book from a respected academic press. The author(s) may or may not be credible. Not every source is from a peer-reviewed academic journal or press. The author(s) lack credibility. Sources are not published in a peer-reviewed academic journal or press.
Warranted Bias Correctly distinguishes author(s) who avoid unwarranted bias against good evidence and arguments, and who use warranted bias against bad behaviors or false claims, from authors who don’t. Mostly distinguishes author(s) who avoid unwarranted bias against good evidence and arguments, and who use warranted bias against bad behaviors or false claims, from authors who don’t. Does not distinguish author(s) who avoid unwarranted bias against good evidence and arguments, and who use warranted bias against bad behaviors or false claims, from authors who don’t.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly while finding trustworthy sources. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly while finding trustworthy sources. However, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures used while finding trustworthy sources. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Creating a Research Question Rubric (Chapter 10)

TASK: Create a Research Question
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Clear, Complex, and Focused Question The research question is clear, complex, and focused. It is not unnecessarily loaded or leaning. It sets up a researchable and realistic project. The research question remains too broad or too narrow. It is somewhat unnecessarily loaded or leaning. It is not very researchable and the project it sets up is not very realistic. The research question requires refining. The research question is extremely broad or narrow. It is very unnecessarily loaded or leaning. It is not researchable and sets up an unrealistic project. The research question requires major refining.
Arguable Answers The possible answers to the research question (the thesis) are arguable. These answers can be much more than just “yes” or “no.” The possible answers to the research question (the thesis) are only partially arguable. These answers can be only slightly more than just “yes” or “no.” The possible answers to the research question (the thesis) are unarguable. These answers can only be a mere “yes” or “no.”
Relevance to the scholarly conversation The research question is relevant to the scholarly conversation and includes key concepts in the discipline. Other researchers and scholars are likely to be highly interested in the question. The research question is somewhat relevant to the scholarly conversation and may be missing a key concept. Other researchers and scholars may only be slightly interested in this discourse. The research question does not add anything of value to the scholarly conversation and is lacking any key concepts. Other researchers and scholars would not be interested in this question.
Question relates to available scholarly sources and evidence Key research sources and evidence are available and relate directly to the research question. Key research sources and evidence may only partially available and may only partially relate to the research question. Key research sources and evidence are not available and/or do not relate to the research question.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA is used correctly throughout the research question. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly throughout the research question, but with mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. The research question contains multiple incorrect sentence structures and lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Creating an Abstract Rubric (Chapter 10)

TASK: Create an Abstract
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Purpose The abstract is clear, concise, and relevant. The abstract could be clearer, more concise, and/or more relevant. The purpose of the abstract is not clear, concise, and/or relevant.
Methodologies / Methods Identifies the methods / methodologies used to support the thesis or answer the research question in an organized, specific, and concise manner. Identifies the methods / methodologies used, but does not show how they support the thesis or answer the research question. Does not identify the methods / methodologies used or how they support the thesis or answer the research question.
Evidence Identifies key evidence found within the research clearly and concisely, and connects it to the purpose of the study. Identifies evidence found within the research but does not clearly connect the evidence to the purpose of the study. Does not identify key evidence.
Results/Conclusion Provides an explanation of what was expected, discovered, accomplished, collected, and produced throughout their research in an organized, specific, and concise manner. Provides an incomplete or confusing explanation of what was expected, discovered, accomplished, collected. Does not provide an explanation of what was expected, discovered, accomplished, collected, and/or produced throughout their research.
Grammar/Mechanics The abstract is the appropriate length and MLA or APA is used correctly throughout. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly throughout the abstract, but with mistakes. It’s not quite the appropriate length, and some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. The abstract contains multiple incorrect sentence structures and lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization, and it is not long enough.

 

Relating the Conceptual and Concrete Rubric (Chapter 11)

TASK: Relate the Conceptual and Concrete
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
General to Specific Argument successfully moves from a broad concept and its general principles to a specific/concrete case and vice versa. Argument sometimes moves from a broad concept and its general principles to a specific/concrete case and vice versa. Argument does not move from a broad concept and its general principles to a specific/concrete case or vice versa.
Supportive Data/Evidence Conclusion of the argument is successfully supported by effective data and evidence. Conclusion of the argument is somewhat supported by data and evidence. Conclusion of the argument is not supported by data and evidence.
Expect Counter-Arguments Successfully acknowledges and counters possible opposing arguments. Somewhat acknowledges and counters possible opposing arguments. Does not acknowledge and/or counter possible opposing arguments.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly while relating the conceptual and concrete. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly while relating the conceptual and concrete. However, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures used while relating the conceptual and concrete. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Positing a Thesis Statement Rubric (Chapter 12)

TASK: Posit a Thesis Statement
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Clarity The thesis statement clearly conveys the argument and answers the research question. The reader knows what to expect from the work. The thesis statement only slightly conveys the argument and/or answers the research question. The reader isn’t sure what to expect from the work. The thesis statement does not convey the argument and does not answer the research question. The reader has no idea what to expect from the work.
Arguable The thesis statement is arguable. Other answers are possible, but they are not as strong as this thesis statement. The thesis statement is only partially arguable, or other answers are possible, but they are just as strong as this thesis statement. The thesis statement is unarguable, or other answers are possible, but they are stronger than this particular thesis statement.

 

Meaningful Discourse The thesis statement situates claims in existing scholarly discourse. It adds value to the scholarly conversation. The thesis statement partially situates claims in existing scholarly discourse. It does not add much value to the scholarly conversation. The thesis statement does not situate claims in existing scholarly discourse. It does not add any value to the scholarly conversation.
Position Takes a supportable position on the chosen topic and acknowledges other positions. Takes a supportable position on the chosen topic, but fails to acknowledge other positions. Does not take a supportable position on their chosen topic.
Effectiveness Thesis statement is specific, relevant, and compelling. It effectively organizes all the points made in the rest of the work. Thesis statement is only slightly specific, relevant, and/or compelling. It partially organizes all the points made in the rest of the work. Thesis statement is not specific, relevant, and/or compelling. It does not organize the points made in the rest of the work.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA is used correctly in the thesis statement. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly in the thesis statement, but with mistakes. Some awkward phrases or sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. The thesis statement contains multiple incorrect phrase or sentence structures and lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Composing a Title Rubric (Chapter 12)

TASK: Compose a Title
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
References the literary work, theory, and/or method The title references the student’s chosen literary work, theory, and/or method. The title is vague about the student’s chosen literary work, theory, and/or method. The title does not reference the student’s chosen literary work, theory, and/or method at all.
Clarity The reader knows exactly what to expect from the student’s work. The reader isn’t exactly sure what to expect from the student’s work just yet. The reader has no idea what to expect from the student’s work based on the title.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA is used correctly in the title. Grammar, punctuation, and capitalization are used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly in the title, but with mistakes. Some awkward word choices or phrases as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. The title contains multiple incorrect sentence structures and lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.
References Thesis Statement* The title references the chosen argument.* The title only slightly references the chosen argument.* The title does not reference the chosen argument at all.*

* Note: Titles that reference thesis statements and arguments may be OPTIONAL. Please check with your instructor.

 

Defining Key Terms Rubric (Chapter 12)

TASK: Define Key Terms
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Detailed Definition Includes key terms with definitions from disciplinary sources. Includes key terms but with broad or vague definitions, and/or those definitions were not from disciplinary sources. Key terms were not included or were not defined.
Consideration of Audience Target audience – novice or professional – was carefully considered. Target audience – novice or professional – was only somewhat considered. Target audience was not considered.
Acknowledgment of Other Definitions Different definitions, if they exist, were acknowledged. If one definition is favored over others, there is an adequate explanation. Some different definitions were acknowledged, and/or there was no explanation for why one definition was favored over others. Other definitions were not acknowledged.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Sources were cited properly. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. Sources were cited with slight errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Sources were not cited, and/or sources were cited with major errors.

 

Structuring Your Writing Rubric (Chapter 13)

TASK: Structure Your Writing
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Organization The organization of material is clear, effective, and appropriate. The organization of material is not as clear, effective, and/or appropriate as it could be. The organization of material is not clear, effective, and/or appropriate.
Counter Arguments Successfully acknowledges and counters possible opposing arguments. Somewhat acknowledges and counters possible opposing arguments. Does not acknowledge and/or counter possible opposing arguments.
Consideration of Audience The target audience was carefully considered. The target audience was only briefly considered. The target audience was not considered.
Grammar/Mechanics MLA or APA was used correctly. Sentence structure as well as grammar, punctuation, and capitalization were used correctly with minimal to no errors. Generally, MLA or APA format is used correctly. However, there are some mistakes. Some awkward sentences appear as well as some grammar, punctuation, and capitalization errors. There are multiple incorrect sentence structures. It also lacks the use of correct MLA or APA format. There are significant errors in grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.

 

Avoiding Plagiarism Rubric (Chapter 14)

TASK: Avoid Plagiarism
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
Above Satisfactory (A/B) Satisfactory (C) Below Satisfactory (D/F)
Proper Citations Sources were cited correctly using the proper MLA or APA format. Sources were cited with minor mistakes. Sources were cited incorrectly and/or sources were cited with major formatting errors.
Paraphrasing & Direct Quotes Paraphrasing is distinctly different from its source material. Quotes are introduced and cited correctly. Paraphrasing is close to the source material. Quotes are mostly introduced and cited correctly, but with errors. Paraphrasing is far too close to the source material. Quotes lack introductions and/or are cited incorrectly.
Avoid Self-Plagiarism Student acknowledges and cites the past work they’ve turned in. Student somewhat acknowledges the past work they’ve turned in. The student does not acknowledge and/or cite the past work they’ve turned in.

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